Converting amSynthPreset to LV2 standards

As I created many amSynth presets for standalone usage, I needed to convert them to a different standard as I wanted to use them within the LV2 plugin version of amSynth. I converted the first presets by hand, which was a painstaking experience. As I had many more to go, I wondered whether I could automate this process. With trail and error I created a script. It uses a template, copies it and replaces the values from the given preset.

Continue reading “Converting amSynthPreset to LV2 standards”

LINE 6 Mobile Keys 25 on Ubuntu Studio 12.04

As I was looking for a new (smaller) MIDI keyboard for my home studio, my eyes fell in love with the “basic” looking LINE 6 Mobile Keys 25. Reading the specs this could easily be my next big studio love… The next question popped up, would the LINE 6 Mobile Keys 25 be compatible with my Digital Audio Workstation (DAW)!?

Continue reading “LINE 6 Mobile Keys 25 on Ubuntu Studio 12.04”

Ubuntu upgrade resulting in a no sound situation

After working happily a couple of months with Ubuntu 10.04 I installed a new kernel with the update feature. This resulted in not having any sound or volume controls. After reading a lot on internet articles  I found the following article… Comprehensive Sound Problem Solutions Guide v0.5e I followed the following commands that brought back sound to my notebook.

Getting the ALSA drivers from a *fresh* kernel

Sometimes, sound might be configured correctly, but for some reason or another (tinkering) it stops working. One way to go back to the old setup is to reinstall Ubuntu. However, this step is actually quite unnecessary since you are reinstalling everything because of one thing.

A faster way, is to just remove the problematic packages and reinstall them cleanly.

Step – 1: Remove these packages

Code:

sudo apt-get –purge remove linux-sound-base alsa-base alsa-utils

Step – 2: Reinstall those same packages

Code:

sudo apt-get install linux-sound-base alsa-base alsa-utils

[LIST][*]

VERY IMPORTANT NOTE: Ubuntu (GNOME) users have reported that packages ‘gdm’ and ‘ubuntu-desktop’ are removed after removing the linux-sound-base packages. If this happens, then do the following

Code:

sudo apt-get install gdm ubuntu-desktop

Step – 3: Reboot

Getting Broadcom STA to work on Ubuntu Studio 13.04 or Xubuntu

As I upgraded Ubuntu Studio 12.10 to Ubuntu Studio 13.04 on my Mac Book 5.1 my wireless stopped working… After surfing the internet for a couple of days I’ve found the following solution to enable the Broadcom STA on my Mac Book 5.1.

Check whether Ubuntu sees your Broadcom STA device by running the lspci command from a terminal:

lspci | grep Network

 

After using the the lspci command you should get something like this:

03:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4322 802.11a/b/g/n Wireless LAN Controller (rev 01)

 

Next up is, installing the drivers. To install the drivers run the following command using the terminal:

sudo apt-get install firmware-b43-installer

 

The broadcom-sta-common package, blacklists the b43 driver.

To fix this you need to edit the file: /etc/modprobe.d/broadcom-sta-dkms.conf

 

You can do that by using the following command in the terminal:

sudo nano /etc/modprobe.d/broadcom-sta-dkms.conf

 

Delete or comment out with a “#” the line “blacklist b43”, my file looks like this:

# wl module from Broadcom conflicts with the following modules:
# blacklist b43
blacklist b43legacy
blacklist b44
blacklist bcma
blacklist brcm80211
blacklist brcmsmac
blacklist ssb

 

Then to force the module to load during boot by using the following command in the terminal:

sudo nano /etc/modules

 

Then add a line with “b43”, my /etc/modules file looks like this:

# /etc/modules: kernel modules to load at boot time.
#
# This file contains the names of kernel modules that should be loaded
# at boot time, one per line. Lines beginning with “#” are ignored.
lp
rtc
b43

 

You don’t need to reboot your computer as you can load the module manually by entering the following command in the terminal:

sudo modprobe b43

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line.

Backing up and restoring software installations in Ubuntu

Sometimes you just want to restore (or clone) your favorite (studio ;-)) installation, to a clean installed, freshly formatted machine, without having to  install manually all your favorite applications again.

This can be done, by exporting the list of all your installed applications to a text file and reinstall all your applications listed in the text file to your freshly formatted machine (as Hannibal would have said “I love it when a plan comes together“).

First create a text file in your ‘Home’ folder containing a list of all your applications of your favorite (studio ;-)) installation. Open a terminal window:

sudo dpkg –get-selections > app-backup-list.txt

 

Next copy the file “app-backup-list.txt” from your ‘Home’ folder to your freshly formatted machine (your ‘Home’ folder will do ;-). Now to restore your applications, open a terminal window:

sudo dpkg –get-selections < app-backup-list.txt
sudo apt-get -y update
sudo apt-get dselect-upgrade

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line .