Connect your WiiMote to Windows using the BlueSoleil bluetooth stack

All right I received even more mail saying “my bluetooth software doesn’t look like yours” (see this article or this article)… As said before that is possible because there are several bluetooth packages around. In this article I’ll try to explain how you can connect your WiiRemote to Windows XP while using the BlueSoleil bluetooth stack.

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

  • Hardware
    • Computer
    • Bluetooth adapter (an adapter for using an open wireless protocol for exchanging data over short distances).
    • Wii Remote (also known as a wiimote, the primary controller for Nintendo’s Wii console)
  • Software

 

Open BlueSoleil

Now press 1+2 on your WiiMote so all four of the lights blink. While the lights are blinking on your WiiReMote click on the orange sphere in the BlueSoleil program to find the WiiMote.

While the lights of your WiiReMote are still blinking double click the newly found device.

 

Right click on the newly paired WiiMote, go to Connect and select Bluetooth Human Interface Device Service.

 

Click “Next”.

 

The New Hardware Wizard will automatically install drivers for the WiiMote.

You might get asked to Continue or Stop the installation. Click “Continue Anyway”.

If all went well you’ll see a green dotted line attached from the orange sphere to your WiiMote.

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line.

 

How to connect your WiiMote using Windows XP

This weekend I received a couple of emails asking me whether it was possible to use the WiiMote in combination with MS Windows… Yes it is possible 🙂 and in this article I’ll try to explain how you could connect your Wii Remote in Windows XP.

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

  • Hardware
    • Computer
    • Bluetooth adapter (an adapter for using an open wireless protocol for exchanging data over short distances).
    • Wii Remote (also known as a wiimote, the primary controller for Nintendo’s Wii console)

Here is a step by step explanation:

Double click on the Bluetooth icon in the lower right corner of your screen (an other place where you can find the bluetooth software is in the Control Panel). The icon should look like this

You can add a new connection by pressing the new connection button (if your pop-up windows doesn’t look like the picture below you’re probably using a different bluetooth stack. You might wanna check here ).

Press 1+2 on the WiiMote then select the fast modus and press Next.

After several seconds Windows XP should find the WiiMote, press Next to make the connection.

If all went well you’ll see you have a connected WiiMote

You can disconnect your WiiMote by either pressing the red button on your WiiMote or by right clicking your WiiMote-icon and select disconnect.

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line.

Use the Wii Nunchuck as a MIDI controller

Some weeks ago Wolfgang Gaube (a composer, musician and and sound designer) wrote me an email asking me, because I had some experience with the Wii and MIDI, whether it would be possible to use the Wii Nunchuck as a MIDI controller (hardware or software which generates and transmits MIDI data to MIDI-enabled devices). That’s how our cooperation started, we exchanged gear and setup details and started to work. Some research, scripting, trail and error resulted in a slick script for GlovePie…

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

  • Hardware
    • Computer
    • Bluetooth adapter (an adapter for using an open wireless protocol for exchanging data over short distances).
    • Wii Remote (also known as a wiimote, the primary controller for Nintendo’s Wii console)
    • Wii Nunchuck (Its appearance when attached to the Wii Remote resembles the nunchaku, hence the name)
  • Software
    • GlovePie (is a free Programmable Input Emulator, originally for the Essential Reality P5 Virtual Reality Glove, which now supports a huge range of input devices, especially the Nintendo Wii Remote (Wiimote))
    • MIDI Yoke (allows you to connect the MIDI output from one program to the MIDI input of a different program)
    • MIDI-OX (is a 32 bit multi-purpose tool: it is both a diagnostic tool and a System Exclusive librarian. It can perform filtering and mapping of MIDI data streams. It displays incoming MIDI streams, and passes the data to a MIDI output driver or the MIDI Mapper.)
    • ZynAddSubFX (is a open source software synthesizer capable of making a countless number of instruments, from some common heard from expensive hardware to interesting sounds that you’ll boost to an amazing universe of sounds)
    • WiiNunChuck2Midi GlovePie script (a script that converts Nunchuck movements to MIDI controller information)

 

Let’s get going:

Where possible I provided links to the necessary download locations.

Download MIDI Yoke and install it.

Press Close and REBOOT your computer.

 

 

Configuring MIDI ports in Windows

Configure your MIDI ports in Windows by accessing the control panel (Start / Control Panel) and select “Sounds and Audio Devices”.

Go to the “Audio” TAB and select “Out to MIDI Yoke: 1”  as MIDI music playback device and click “OK”.

 

Download MIDI-OX and install it.

 

Configuring MIDI-OX

Now we have to configure MIDI-OX to pass the MIDI signal from MIDI Yoke: 1 to MIDI Yoke: 2

 

What is really happening:

GlovePie converts the Wii Nunchuck movements to MIDI controller information and sends the MIDI signals via the “MIDI Yoke: 1”  to MIDI-OX, MIDI-OX on its turn sends the MIDI signals to ZynAddSubFX via “MIDI Yoke: 2”.  ZynAddSubFX converts the MIDI signal into a sound effect (Wii Nunchuck movements >> GlovePie >> MIDI Yoke: 1 >> MIDI-OX >> MIDI Yoke: 2 >> ZynAddSubFX >> Sound effect).

 

Start MIDI-OX go to “Options” and select “”MIDI devices”.

 

Now select “In From MIDI Yoke: 1” as input and select “Out To MIDI Yoke: 2” as output and click OK.

 

 

Download ZynAddSubFX and install it.

 

Configuring MIDI ports in ZynAddSubFX

Go to “File” and select “Settings”.

In the right bottom corner select “In From MIDI Yoke: 2” as MIDI-in device, and click “Close”.

 

Download GlovePie and install it. GlovePie doesn’t come with an installer so you have to create a folder and extract the zip file into the folder. In my case I created a folder called “C:\Program Files\GlovePie”. I also created a shortcut to my desktop (right click “GlovePIE.exe”, send to, shortcut to desktop).

 

 

Configuring GlovePie

After the installation of GlovePie we need a script that actually converts the Wii Nunchuck movements to MIDI controller events. So I wrote a script called Wii Nunchuck to MIDI (WiiNunChuck2MIDI), download the WiiNunChuck2MIDI GlovePie script and extract it to the “GlovePie\WiimoteScripts” folder (In our case the “C:\Program Files\GlovePie\WiimoteScripts” folder).

Check this update : Wii2MIDI including NunChuck MIDI control

 

Connecting the Wii Remote to Windows

Connect WiiMote to Windows by accessing the control panel (Start / Control Panel) and select “Bluetooth Devices”.

Click the “Add” button.

Select “My Device is set up and ready to be found”, press 1+2 on your WiiMote and click “Next”.

Select the found Nintendo device and click “Next”.

Select don’t use passkey and click “Next” then click “Finish”.

 

Now let’s Rock and Roll !

  • Start ZynAddSybFX select an instrument by going to “Instrument” and select “Show instrument bank” use the drop down box in the upper left corner and choose something you like (you can change instruments later while everything is up and running).
  • Start MIDI-OX
  • Connect your Wii Remote to Windows
  • Hookup your Wii Nunchuck to your Wii Remote
  • Start GlovePie
  • Load and start the WiiNunChuck2MIDI script
  • Play notes with you (virtual) keyboard and start controlling your sounds with Nunchuck movements 🙂
  • Have fun !!!

 

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line

Connect your WiiMote to Windows XP using the Microsoft bluetooth stack

All right I received a mail saying, my bluetooth software doesn’t look like yours (see this article). That’s possible because there are several bluetooth packages being used, in this article I’ll try to explain how you can connect your WiiRemote to Windows XP while using the Microsoft bluetooth stack.

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

  • Hardware
    • Computer
    • Bluetooth adapter (an adapter for using an open wireless protocol for exchanging data over short distances).
    • Wii Remote (also known as a wiimote, the primary controller for Nintendo’s Wii console)
  • Software
    • Windows XP

 

Connect WiiMote to Windows by accessing the control panel (Start / Control Panel) and select “Bluetooth Devices”.

Click the “Add” button.

Select “My Device is set up and ready to be found”, now press 1+2 on your WiiMote and click “Next”.

Select the found Nintendo device and click “Next”.

Select don’t use passkey and click “Next”.

Click “Finish”

If all went well your WiiRemote is now connected.

 

You can disconnect your WiiMote by either pressing the red button on your WiiMote or by right clicking your WiiMote-icon and select disconnect.

 

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line.

Combining the WiiMote with GlovePie to make MIDI music

After the first article on using the Wii Remote in Windows XP I tried to take it one step further, taking it to the next level using the WiiMote to make MIDI music.

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

  • Hardware
    • Computer
    • Bluetooth adapter (an adapter for using an open wireless protocol for exchanging data over short distances).
    • Wii Remote (also known as a wiimote, the primary controller for Nintendo’s Wii console)
  • Software
    • GlovePie(is a free Programmable Input Emulator, originally for the Essential Reality P5 Virtual Reality Glove, which now supports a huge range of input devices, especially the Nintendo Wii Remote (Wiimote))
    • MIDI Yoke (allows you to connect the MIDI output from one program to the MIDI input of a different program)
    • MIDI-OX (is a 32 bit multi-purpose tool: it is both a diagnostic tool and a System Exclusive librarian. It can perform filtering and mapping of MIDI data streams. It displays incoming MIDI streams, and passes the data to a MIDI output driver or the MIDI Mapper.)
    • ZynAddSubFX (is a open source software synthesizer capable of making a countless number of instruments, from some common heard from expensive hardware to interesting sounds that you’ll boost to an amazing universe of sounds)
    • Wii2MIDI GlovePie script (a script that converts buttons being pressed on the Wii Remote to MIDI note on / off information (there are multiple GlovePie scripts for download in this article))

 

Let’s get going:

Where possible I provided links to the necessary download locations.

Download MIDI Yoke and install it.

Press Close and REBOOT your computer.

 

 

Configuring MIDI ports in Windows

Configure your MIDI ports in Windows by accessing the control panel (Start / Control Panel) and select “Sounds and Audio Devices”.

Go to the “Audio” TAB and select “Out to MIDI Yoke: 1”  as MIDI music playback device and click “OK”.

 

Download MIDI-OX and install it.

 

 

Configuring MIDI-OX

Now we have to configure MIDI-OX to pass the MIDI signal from MIDI Yoke: 1 to MIDI Yoke: 2

 

What is really happening:

GlovePie converts buttons being pressed on the Wii Remote to MIDI note on / off information and sends the MIDI note on/off signal via the “MIDI Yoke: 1”  to MIDI-OX, MIDI-OX on its turn sends the MIDI note on/off signals to ZynAddSubFX via “MIDI Yoke: 2”.  ZynAddSubFX converts the MIDI signal into a sound (Buttons pressed on WiiMote >> GlovePie >> MIDI Yoke: 1 >> MIDI-OX >> MIDI Yoke: 2 >> ZynAddSubFX >> Sound).

 

Start MIDI-OX go to “Options” and select “”MIDI devices”.

 

Now select “In From MIDI Yoke: 1” as input and select “Out To MIDI Yoke: 2” as output and click OK.

 

 

Download ZynAddSubFX and install it.

 

Configuring MIDI ports in ZynAddSubFX

Go to “File” and select “Settings”.

In the right bottom corner select “In From MIDI Yoke: 2” as MIDI-in device, and click “Close”.

 

Download GlovePie and install it. GlovePie doesn’t come with an installer so you have to create a folder and extract the zip file into the folder. In my case I created a folder called “C:\Program Files\GlovePie”. I also created a shortcut to my desktop (right click “GlovePIE.exe”, send to, shortcut to desktop).

 

 

Configuring GlovePie

After the installation of GlovePie we need a script that actually converts the buttons that are being pressed on the WiiMote to MIDI note on/off events. So I wrote a script called Wii to MIDI (Wii2MIDI), download the Wii2MIDI GlovePie script (or the newer script v1.1) and extract it to the “GlovePie\WiimoteScripts” folder (In our case the “C:\Program Files\GlovePie\WiimoteScripts” folder). OK, I’ve just updated the Wii to MIDI script (again) so it can play the whole range of MIDI notes (octave 1 till octave 8), basically it sets you of with having a full blown MIDI keyboard within your reach (download Wii2MIDI v1.3 here). If you want to use your WiiMotes as drumsticks you could also try this GlovePie script called Wii to MIDI whacker, it triggers MIDI notes while whacking your WiiMote and pressing buttons. Like the Wii to MIDI script version 1.3 it also enables octave scaling using the plus and minus buttons on your Wii Remote (you can actually scale octaves for each separate WiiRemote).

 

 

Connecting the Wii Remote to Windows

Connect WiiMote to Windows by accessing the control panel (Start / Control Panel) and select “Bluetooth Devices”.

Click the “Add” button.

Select “My Device is set up and ready to be found”, press 1+2 on your WiiMote and click “Next”.

Select the found Nintendo device and click “Next”.

Select don’t use passkey and click “Next” then click “Finish”.

 

Now let’s Rock and Roll !

  • Start ZynAddSybFX select an instrument by going to “Instrument” and select “Show instrument bank” use the drop down box in the upper left corner and choose something you like (you can change instruments later while everything is up and running).
  • Start MIDI-OX
  • Connect Wii
  • Start GlovePie
  • Load and start the Wii2MIDI script.
  • Have fun !!!

 

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line !

How to use the WiiMote with Wiinstrument

Wiinstrument is a small and easy to use program that shows you some possibilities of how you can use your WiiMote to make music in Windows. In this article I’ll try to explain how you could easily connect the Wii Remote (and your Wii Nunchuck) to this program called Wiinstrument.

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

  • Hardware
    • Computer
    • Bluetooth adapter (an adapter for using an open wireless protocol for exchanging data over short distances).
    • Wii Remote (also known as a wiimote, the primary controller for Nintendo’s Wii console)
    • Wii Nunchuck(Like the Wii Remote, the Nunchuk also provides a three-axis accelerometer for motion-sensing and tilting, but without a speaker, a rumble function, or a pointer function)
  • Software

 

Here is a step by step explanation:

First you’ll have to connect your Wii Remote to your computer. If you don’t know how to, read this article on my website.

 

Now let’s start using the Wii Remote (and the Wii Nunchuck) with Wiinstrument (which you can download here).

Download the software and extract is into a folder you prefer. Wiinstrument doesn’t come with an installer so you have to create a folder yourself and extract the zip-file into the empty folder. In my case I created a folder called “C:\Program Files\Wiinstrument”. I also created a shortcut to my desktop (right click “The Wiinstrument.exe”, send to, shortcut to desktop).

 

Hookup your Nunchuck to your WiiMote.

If you haven’t got your Wii mote connected already, now is the time to do so!

After you’ve got your WiiMote connected start the executable called “The Wiinstrument.exe” (or double click the icon you created on your desktop). You should see something similar as the following screenshot. You can test your connectivity and the working of your WiiMote and Nunchuck by shaking them. Shaking them should result into sinusoid like graphics in the accelerometers window.

Now let’s start drumming by pressing the “home” button on your WiiMote. You can select which note to play by pressing the plus and minus buttons.

 

Now, that ain’t all… You can also use the program as a Wii Remote triggered sampler (press the “home” button again).

 

This is pretty amazing isn’t!? But we ain’t finished yet! Press the “home” button one more time… And you’ve got yourself a Wiimote Kiiboard

 

By pressing the “home” button again you’re back at the first page of Wiinstrument.

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line.

TonidoPlug running Squeezecenter 

One of the best gadgets I bought recently is a TonidoPlug, the TonidoPlug is based upon the well known SheevaPlug. The SheevaPlug is a 1000 MHz Marvell CPU combined with 512 MB flash, and 512 MB internal RAM. At the size of roughly two cigarette boxes it makes it an ideal home server using just 5 watt. These great hardware specs are combined with a great software package running on top of it. The package is based on Ubuntu 9.04 and lets you choose to use a variety of services (Torrent Client, Photo Gallery, Jukebox, WebsharePro (remote access to your files), Workspace, Thots, Search, Backup and Explorer). It’s really easy to setup and you can easily expand its capabilities.

Being a music lover I use Squeezecenter (also known as Squeezebox Server) for listening to my mp3 collection or internet radio. Before I bought the TonidoPlug, I used an old pc as a Squeezecenter server. The old server was using 300 Watt, made a lot of noise and was never up and runinng when I wanted to listen to my music. It resulted me ending up waiting 5 minutes each time while starting up the old cow. Now things have changed after reading several articles I managed to install Squeezecenter server on my TonidoPlug. In this article I’ll try to walk you through.

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

When you first receive you TonidoPlug, read the manual and configure the TonidoPlug as described (which means you need to create an account, change your basic admin password (nosoup4u)). Make sure your TonidoPlug is working properly, logon to it and update if necesarry.

The next thing you need to do is Repartition and Format your External USB drive (or don’t)

1 – Swap partition (1 GB)
2 – EXT3 filesystem (8 GB and make sure it’s flagged bootable)
3 – NTFS data (mp3) storage (rest)

Now you’ve repartitioned and formatted your External USB drive you can hook it up to your TonidoPlug.

Start up Putty and connect to your TonidoPlug.

mount /dev/sda1 /media/usb0

 

Download the root and modules tar ball from TonidoPlug site and place in the newly created partition:

cd /media/usb0
wget http://www.tonido.com/downloads/plug/rootfs.tar.gz
wget http://www.tonido.com/downloads/plug/modules.tar.gz

 

Untar the downloaded tar file onto the ext3 partition:

tar zxvf rootfs.tar.gz
tar zxvf modules.tar.gz

 

Now stop tonido and copy the tonido directory from your existing internal flash disk:

initctl emit tstop
cp -dpr /root/app/ /media/usb0/root/

 

Now everything is ready. You can unmount the drive and reboot the plug. Leave the USB harddisk on the plug itself. When the plug reboots, it should reboot off the USB drive:

cd /root
umount /media/usb0
reboot

 

You can ensure that the plug has booted on the external HDD by using the following command:

df -h /

Filesystem                            Size  Used Avail Use%
Mounted on rootfs                8G  669M  2.9G  10% /

You can see that we have booted the plug of the 8GB External USB drive. If you see 512MB then probably you are still booting of the internal flash.

 

The DHCP client is configured to ignore any DNS servers returned by the DHCP server and use 127.0.0.1 instead, while there is no local DNS server. Consequently, you won’t be able to connect to any hosts by name until you fix this. In order to fix it:

Edit /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf and comment out or delete the line “supersede domain-name-servers 127.0.0.1;”.

Run “dhclient eth0”:

dhclient eth0

 

Try “ping kernel.org” – it should work:

ping.kernel.org

 

The directory /var/cache/apt/archives/partial which the APT package management system uses lives on a RAM disk, so it gets wiped on every boot. Marvell helpfully included a boot script to recreate the directory, but they not so helpfully failed to make the boot script actually work. Additionally, /tmp and /var/tmp have invalid permissions. To fix these problems: Edit /etc/rc.local. The two insmod commands fail, and because the shell is invoked with the -e flag (see first line of the file), a failing command causes the whole script to exit. Delete or comment out all lines except “mkdir -p /var/cache/apt/archives/partial” and add “chmod 1777 /tmp /var/tmp” before the mkdir. You might also want to add, after the mkdir, a line “/usr/sbin/ntpdate-debian” to automatically sync your clock over the network.

After editing, run “/etc/rc.local” from the command line:

/etc/rc.local

 

The TimeZone is not set.
To fix it, just execute the following command as root and select the appropriate timezone for you:

dpkg-reconfigure tzdata

 

Update your OS:

apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade
apt-get autoremove

 

Now check your partitions by typing:

fdisk -l

 

initialize the swap:

mkswap /dev/sda3

 

enable swap:

swapon /dev/sda3

 

If you’ve done everything correctly, swap will be working. You can check by:

cat /proc/meminfo

 

The next thing to do is to put the swap information in /etc/fstab so that it will enable the swap at boot. Edit /etc/fstab and add the line:

/dev/sda3      none  swap  sw  0  0

 

Next we’ll install Squeezecenter server:

wget http://downloads.slimdevices.com/SqueezeboxServer_v7.5.1/squeezeboxserver_7.5.1_all.deb
dpkg -i squeezeboxserver_7.5.1_all.deb apt-get -f install

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line !

Making music using a computer, Wiimote and PureData

An article that appeared on the Create Digital Music website, about making music using the WiiMote and a computer, drew my attention. Several hints were given on the how to, but as always in doing new things the information was scattered everywhere and nowhere. After reading many articles and watching many videos I found out how to realize a working setup for myself. In this article I’ll try to explain the steps needed to create a working setup for yourself.

Prerequisites (what you need to get it working):

  • Hardware
    • Computer
    • Bluetooth adapter (an adapter for using an open wireless protocol for exchanging data over short distances).
    • Wii Remote (also known as a wiimote, the primary controller for Nintendo’s Wii console)
  • Software
    • Ubuntu Studio (a multimedia editing/creation flavor of Ubuntu. It’s built for the GNU/Linux audio, video, and graphic enthusiast or professional)
    • Pure Data (a real-time graphical programming environment for audio, video, and graphical processing)
    • Wiilib (a library of externals enabling you to use a Wii remote controller in Pure Data)
    • CWiid(a collection of Linux tools written in C for interfacing to the Nintendo Wiimote)
    • Pure Data programs to combine all of them resulting in sound creation.

 

Let’s get going:

Where possible I provided links to the necessary download locations.

You either have an pre installed bluetooth adapter in your computer or you can buy one in the shop.

Download the Ubuntu Studio 9.10 (Karmic) DVD Image and burn it to DVD.

Repartition your hard disk (or don’t), and install Ubuntu Studio 9.10

Make sure you’ve got batteries Wii Remote

 

Open a terminal session in Ubuntu then copy and paste the following instructions:

sudo apt-get install libcwiid1 lswm wmgui wminput

 

Sometimes it comes in handy to know your gear so at this point, you can turn on the Wii remote to scan by pressing 1 and 2 simultaneously (all the lights will flash) then running:

hcitool scan

 

After you installed the necessary packages, you we’ll be able to give it the first shot by entering wmgui in a terminal window

wmgui

 

Select “connect” from the file menu, press 1+2 on the Wiimote when prompted then click OK. Lights and rumble can be turned on and off from the controls menu, and which inputs are displayed from the settings menu. Using this, you can test the IR camera (I didn’t have infrared lights so I used a candle (BE VERY CAREFULL WITH OPEN FIRE IN AND AROUND YOUR LIVING AREA not to set the place on fire)), the accelerometers and check the inputs from the Nunchuck or Classic Controller.

 

Now you know basic set-up is working (your computer running Ubuntu Studio, your bluetooth adapter, your Wii Remote and the “connection” between it all).

 

Getting the Wiimote working with Pure Data

Copy wiilib.pd_linux (alternative download: wiilib.pd_linux_i386 here or the amd64 version wiilib.pd_linux_amd64 here

sudo move /home/winko/Downloads/wiilib.pd_linux /usr/lib/pd/extra/.

 

Start up PureData and edit the start up parameters to PD by adding “wiilib” to the “PD binaries that need to load” (“File” >> “Startup…”).

 

Close pure data and start up “Jack Audio Connection Kit”.

 

Start PureData again and if all went well you’ll see the following message.

 

Connect to Pure Data to Jack by going to “Media” and select “Jack” you will see the image below. Click “OK”.

 

Now we need to get the sound out of Jack… Go to the “Jack Audio Connection Kit”. Select “pure_data_0” on the left and select “system” on the right than press the “Connect” button. After that it should look like this.

 

Now we’re ready to load a Puredata program to test our setup, it is called wiimote-help.pd (alternative download here). Go to “File” and “Open” in Puredata and select the program called wiimote-help.pd and follow the instructions on the screen. IN ORDER TO CONNECT: First put the wiimote into discover mode (press buttons 1 and 2 simultaneously) then click the flag/button/message called “discover”. Select the reportAcceleration flag/button/message and start shaking your big bad Wii Remote. If all went well you’ll see the green acceleration sliders move.

 

Ok assuming that this went well we can start an actual sound program, in the example below I used  wii_plink.pd (alternative download here) (wii_plink.pd comes with the needed sinegrain.pd make sure they are both in the same directory). Go to “File” and “Open” in Puredata and select the program called wii_plink.pd. IN ORDER TO CONNECT: First put the wiimote into discover mode (press buttons 1 and 2 simultaneously) then click the flag/button/message called “discover”.

 

Now when your shake your Wiimote nothing happens until you select the “compute audio” toggle button in the main Pd window.

Now you should have sound coming out of your speakers, have fun!

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome!

If you created or know different Wiimote enabled Pure Data sound programs, then please let me know and drop me a line.

Cleaning phone numbers in Excel or OO Spreadsheet

Personally I’ve been using Excel for storing phone numbers for almost twenty years now. Every now and then I don’t recognize the phone number so I need to search in my Excel sheet looking up who called me. After ten years and 500 phone numbers plus, the information stored in the Excel sheet is ‘poluted’ with hyphens and spaces. So in this article I’ll try to explain how to clean up messy telephone numbers by removing spaces and separators in Excel?

The following example uses the nesting of formulas by removing the hyphens first, followed removing the spaces.

=SUBSTITUTE(SUBSTITUTE(A2,”-“,””),” “,””)

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome, please let me know and drop me a line.

 

Running Activiti 5.4 on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS

This is an update for the Activiti 5.4 release!!! The boys and girls of the activiti.org development team must have had a busy schedule at the beginning of this year! 🙂 Pulling off monthly updates, they did a very good job again at the Activiti 5.4 release!!! What is Activiti??? Activiti is THE light-weight work-flow and Business Process Management platform targeted at business people, developers and sysadmins. In this “How to” I’ll try to explain how to install the Activiti 5.4 BPM tool demo on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS using the terminal. Previous installations of Activiti are described here 5.0,5.1,5.2, 5.3.

 

[Update 16042011]

Extra, extra read all about it!!! Someone created a Virtual Machine based upon this article (http://thepiratebay.org/torrent/6294837/Activiti_5.4_Demo_VM).

Before you begin make sure your Ubuntu installation is up to date!!!

Install JDK, JRE, Ant and Eclipse at once as you can combine the separate installations, open a terminal window (Applications \ Accessories \ Terminal):

sudo add-apt-repository “deb http://archive.canonical.com/ lucid partner” && sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jdk sun-java6-jre sun-java6-plugin sun-java6-fonts ant eclipse
export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun-1.6.0.24

 

Download Activiti:

wget http://activiti.org/downloads/activiti-5.4.zip
unzip activiti-5.4.zip

 

Install the Demo:

cd activiti-5.4/setup
ant demo.start

 

Open your browser and go to the following URL’s:

The Activiti Explorer is the web based application that provides access for all users of the system to manage task lists and execute process tasks.
http://localhost:8080/activiti-explorer/

 

The Activiti Probe is the web based application that offers admin and monitoring capabilities to keep Activiti Engine up and running.
http://localhost:8080/activiti-probe/

 

The Activiti Modeler is the web based BPMN 2.0 process modeling tool for business analysts.
http://localhost:8080/activiti-modeler/

 

The Activiti Cycle is the web based application that enables collaboration between business users, developers and IT operational people.
http://localhost:8080/activiti-cycle/

 

The Activiti KickStart is a web based component that makes building process solutions as easy as can be for non technical people.
http://localhost:8080/activiti-kickstart/

 

The Activiti Administrator is a new web based component that enables you to do some basic user administration.
http://localhost:8080/activiti-administrator/

 

If needed you can login using the following users:
kermit (pw: kermit)
fozzie (pw: fozzie)
gonzo (pw: gonzo)

Make Activiti start automatically after a reboot or shutdown…

sudo gedit /etc/init.d/activiti

 

Next copy the the next lines of code in the new file and save it:

#! /bin/sh

ACTIVITIPATH=/home/activiti/activiti-5.4/setup

case “$1” in
start)
echo “Starting Activiti from $ACTIVITIPATH”
cd /home/activiti/activiti-5.4/setup && ant h2.start tomcat.start

;;
restart)
$0 stop
$0 start
;;
stop)
echo “Stoping Activiti from $ACTIVITIPATH”
cd /home/activiti/activiti-5.4/setup && ant h2.stop tomcat.stop
;;
*)
echo $”usage: $0 {start|stop|restart}”
exit 3
;;
esac
:

 

 

Now we’ll make the init script executable

sudo chmod a+x /etc/init.d/activiti

 

You can test the script by stopping and starting the server:

sudo /etc/init.d/activiti stop
sudo /etc/init.d/activiti start

 

And finally we’ll make the script start at boot time

sudo update-rc.d activiti defaults 90 10

 

Ready for happily using Actviti

exit

 

Enjoy your Activiti 5.4 installation on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS !!!

 

Suggestions for improving this article are welcome!

Please let me know and drop me a line.